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The Van Echtens' expansion of local power-base took many generations

Founding of Hoogeveen-colony required fortune


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Contents of this Article

  1. Introduction
  2. Privileges gained
  3. Building churches
  4. Devastated by see-saw invasions
  5. No place in States-General
  6. Piet Hein's feat
  7. Squire Roelof
  8. Observer at Synod
  9. Drost
  10. Capital projects
  11. End of truce damaging
  12. Claiming and surrendering rights
  13. Show-down with merchants
  14. Acknowledgement from participants
  15. Tension among the participants
  16. Board of directors
  17. Interference and vandalism
  18. New participants
  19. Site of town
  20. Change of guard
  21. End of an era
  22. Politics and business

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Six Municipalities Dealt with a Major Population Drain, Chain Effect Lasted for Decades

'Bouwhoek' Frisians Major Group in U.S.-bound Dutch Emigration


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DETROIT, Michigan - The Frisian 'Bouwhoek' - the Northern region behind the dikes of the Frisian Sea is known for its fertile clay and crop farming - has been a major contributor to the flow of Dutch emigrants to the United States. Thousands of Northern Frisians left in the latter part of the 19th century, when a depression hit the local economy. They opted for a better future in the New World. The emigration process was an ongoing phenomenon which lasted several decades and resulted in stagnating population figures, a recent study concludes. Emigrated Frisians from 'Bouwhoek' villages and municipalities often joined people from the same background and thus groups from particular townships settled together in specific New World localities. Numerous are the seasonal labourers from Frisian crop farms who became prosperous farmers in the New World, Annemieke Galema reports in her new book 'Frisians to America, 1880-1914.'

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December 5th national birthday for everyone’s friend from Spain

The Netherlands helps Sint Nicolaas celebrate


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AMSTERDAM, the Netherlands - For centuries in the Netherlands, the 6th of December - and for the grown-ups especially the evening of the 5th - has been a day when nearly everyone is at home, celebrating the birthday of Sint Nicolaas, the kind Spanish bishop. Every year, Sint Nicolaas (also known as Sinterklaas) makes the trip to Holland to celebrate his birthday. He has been doing this for ages, not to receive presents, but to give them, especially to the children.

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Frisian town welcomes ‘Sinterklaas’ in February

Local tradition kept away from limelight


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GROU, the Netherlands - While North Americans get a visit from Saint Nick in the weeks ending with Christmas, the figure on whom Santa Claus is based - St. Nicolaas - visits the Low Lands on December 5th and 6th. Except in the small Frisian village of Grou, where Saint Nicholas’ ‘cousin’ Saint Peter makes his annual visit on February 21. Confused? Here is the story about ’Sint Piter’.

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Toponymy in the Netherlands (2)

Dutch territory extends itself from Babylonia to California, a fascinating case of adopting identities for communities


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Over the centuries, the Dutch have used foreign names and situations to give new frontier settlements a unique identity, often one with a specific connotation. There are names suggesting a biblical origin or indicating the geographical roots of its founders or settlers. Others just refer to some foreign city, region or country. The New World - the Americas - is rife with such Old Country references, beginning with Nieuw Netherland and New England, names still used today. More surprising is that the 'old country' has a number of villages named after American geographical names. While European names prevail in the list of 'foreign names' used in the Netherlands, some clearly have connections with the U.S.A.

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Toponymy in the Netherlands (1)

Communities adopted names from Nil to No End, a case of numericals in Dutch place names


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Where do place names originate from? Many people will wonder about it, but few will bother to find out for themselves. It takes dedicated historians and genealogists to research the matter. What about such place names as Heerlen, Doetinchem, Zwolle and Groningen? While, many towns and villages in the country have identities that are linked to nearby geographical features, a few hundred places have an origin tied to a number. So named perhaps from the way a particular settlement - mostly because of its number of huizen (houses) - was known to folks down the 'road.'

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New biography about Holland's founder

Dutch Emigrants Built 'City' in Dense Michigan Forest


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One hundred and fifty years ago, Dutch emigrants without any experience descended on Michigan's frontiers and literally carved a living out of its dense forests. Among the logs and huge tree trunks they planted the roots of what was to become a city. The initial party of a few hundred people which set to clear Holland's town site, hardly knew how to swing an axe, fall a tree or clear land. Neither could they build basic log cabins fast enough to accommodate themselves or the stream of new arrivals. Life in the 'kolonie' Holland was extremely hard, while food, medicine and money was very scarce and disease at times rampant in the isolated community near Black Lake, just off the eastern shore of Lake Michigan.

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The marriages of seven Dutch monarchs

A review of House of Orange history since 1791


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Crown Prince Willem-Alexander as successor to the Dutch throne is the seventh monarch to enter marriage since his ancestor Prince Willem of Orange Nassau (1772-1843) tied the knot with Princess Frederika Louise Wilhelmina of Prussia in 1791. The son of Stadtholder Prince Willem V, he and his family lived in exile for nearly twenty years while the French under Napoleon occupied the country. Upon the return of Prince Willem VI at the beaches of Scheveningen in 1814, the Dutch led by statesman Gijsbert Karel Van Hogendorp instituted a constitutional monarchy headed by the House of Orange Nassau. Willem assumed the throne as King Willem I. From 1559 to 1795, the House gave - much of the country - an appointed leader who served as Stadtholder (Commander-in Chief and Governor) although two lengthy hiatus occurred during that period.

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